Education and Correctional Populations

December 6, 2010 § Leave a comment

This report is disturbing.  It’s contents and the information is the latest, dated 2003.  Another example of how invisible the prison population is.  I will discuss  this invisibility shortly.

http://www.policyalmanac.org/crime/archive/education_prisons.pdf

Summary:

About 41% of inmates in the Nation’s State and Federal prisons and local jails in 1997 and 31% of probationers had not completed high school or its equivalent. In comparison, 18% of the general population age 18 or older had not finished the 12th grade.  Between 1991 and 1997, the percent of inmates in State prison without a high school diploma or GED remained the same — 40% in 1997 and 41% in 1991. Of inmates in State prisons, 293,000 in 1991 and 420,600 in 1997 had entered prison without a high school diploma, a 44% increase.

Over 9 in 10 State prisons provided educational programs for their inmates. Half of State prison inmates reported they had participated in an educational program since their most recent admission to prison. About a quarter of State inmates had taken basic education or high school level courses, and almost a third, vocational training.

The Value of a Print Publication

December 6, 2010 § Leave a comment

Much of this article, save the emphasis on Ayn Rand’s Objectivism, explains very plainly, the value of achieving the goal of a National Prison Journal in the written form.  There is still value in the old school print form.  The Undercurrent is laid out simply on newsprint and is how I envision the National Prison Journal to be.

The Value of a Print Publication

As a print publication, The Undercurrent can play a unique role in the spread of Objectivism. A small amount of effort on the part of distributors creates a huge impact on the campus environment. The paper injects the name ‘Ayn Rand’ and Objectivist viewpoints into the physical spaces that students frequent, giving Objectivism the familiarity that comes from persistent presence. The paper makes the Objectivist voice a part of the intellectual debate on campus. Further, as a national effort, the project has the potential to outlast individual campus clubs and pool the best talent from schools across the country.

Attracting New Objectivists
The Undercurrent, as a newsletter, is a great medium to expose sympathetic students to the philosophy. Unlike a website, a print publication makes it easy for any student to pick up an issue at the library, a coffee shop, or his dorm lounge, and begin an interest in Objectivism that he otherwise would not have developed. The comprehensive list of club and community events on our last page indicates to the neophyte the scope and progress of the Objectivist movement in America. Students who already have some knowledge of Objectivism are encouraged to learn more.

Ministering to the Needs of Campus Clubs
A multi-campus paper, as the calling card of a broader movement, aids campus clubs in their efforts to promote Objectivism. By distributing The Undercurrent, even the smallest clubs can make a big splash, attracting new members, promoting events, and forging a connection to the larger Objectivist student movement. Besides benefiting from the calendar of campus club events (which includes meetings) printed on our last page, club leaders can stamp their clubs’ contact information on each paper, or enclose a flyer for meetings and events in each copy.

Advancing the Careers of Committed New Intellectuals
Finally, The Undercurrent is hugely beneficial to its staff and writers, the young Objectivist intellectuals who will go on to carry the Objectivist banner into a variety of fields, both academic and professional. It develops and fine-tunes their understanding of Objectivism by involving them in an extensive, self-directed writing and editing process. Although geographically distant, the staff and writers are able to work closely with each other in an inspired joint venture to change the values of the culture.

Brainstorming on Magazine/Newspaper Categories

December 4, 2010 § Leave a comment

I envision the journal a magazine layout more than a newspaper.  Of course, the final layout will be determined by what will be easiest to get into all jails, prison, half-way houses and detention centers.  Staples may be a problem as screws in cassettes are a problem.  So, whichever option come close to fully clearing the hurdle will be the one we go with.

This list is what I’ve thought of to date.  In this section of the NPJP blog I will also break out and brainstorm each proposed section.  It’s all part of the journey!

  • Health
  • Nature
  • Want to Hear From You
  • Speak Your Mind
  • Research Corner
  • Questions (Inside & Out)
  • Letters
  • Politics
  • Self Awareness
  • Business
  • Re-entry
  • Jokes, Riddles, Cartoons, Contests, Recipes, Paper Crafts
  • Art
  • History
  • Literature
  • English Language
  • Foreign Language
  • Math
  • Sociology
  • Psychology
  • Philosophy
  • Cultural Studies
  • Media
  • Ethics
  • Advertisements
  • Subscriptions
  • Grammar/Vocabulary
  • Writing
  • Reality Check
  • …more

Now, looking at the list in writing, many of these areas may be combined or topics regularly covered.

I think the point that is made clearly is that the journal will be varied and stimulating.

National Prison Journal Project (NPJP) is born!

December 2, 2010 § Leave a comment

National Prison Journal Project (NPJP) was born December 1, 2010, in the pages of the yellow and black marbled composition book I now carry with me everywhere.  That was the first day all of my mental traffic converged into a single, comprehensible, achievable idea.

On December 2, 2010, I entered the blogosphere without the hesitation I held for quite a while.  Why?  Because I had a reason, other than my own musings, to do it.

That same day I took action.  Perhaps the hardest part of anything.  Going from the walk of thought, to the jog of writing, to beginning the marathon of  action and realizing a goal.

So here we are.  NPJP and myself.

Currently, we are two separate entities.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the The Publication category at My National Prison Journal Project.

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