Prison is Not Only a Place

December 21, 2010 § Leave a comment

Prison is also a spiritual condition.  And, I am concerned that all the well-meaning movements to change legislation and expose conditions don’t emphasize this nearly enough.

It is easy to communicate what we can “see.”  The walls, the bars, the frisk, the food, the bedding, the garb, the CO’s, the laws.  It is not nearly as easy to translate the everlasting feelings one is left with after having their freedom and identity severed.

I’m thankful there are people who care and want to change the prison industrial complex.  But, these things still focus so squarely on lengthy articles/essays and qualitative/quantitative research to inform.  Not only does this continue the disspatialized understanding society already has on so may crucial subjects, but it disregards the individual spirit that has been incarcerated and left to wonder if they ever really existed.

I have to do a lot of reading in my research for this project, and the element I see most frequently in my readings are numbers and quotes supporting or countering one methodology, theory or whatnot.  The individuals providing the information are lost in the data sets as are the readers.   Those inside are quoted and their voices edited to fit the purpose of the essay, the book, or the point being made.

Prisoners are not data.  The internal prison condition cannot be understood when edited or categorized.

What is lacking horribly, probably because it takes more time than most want to invest, is turning up the volume of that inner voice.  We talk about education, re-entry, recidivism and living conditions, but we rarely acknowledge the one thing that affects all of these others.  The spirit of the people they apply to.

With that said, my project has taken a formidable turn.  The name will change and my goal will change.   The blog will change.  It’s all taking shape now, with help from some very experienced individuals.

I introduce the first of many first-hand voices of value:

  • From Corrections to College: The Value of a Convict’s Voice by Leyva, Martin and Christopher Bickel (2010); Western Criminology Review 11(1):50-60.
  • Abstract: The rise in mass incarceration has been accompanied by an abandonment of first-hand, in-depth accounts of crime and incarceration. Too few criminologists have stepped foot inside a prison, let alone served time within its walls. Situated within a growing movement of convict criminology, this article provides a first-hand account of the abuse convicts often experience in the home, the streets, and later in prison. Breaking from the traditional scholarly format, this autobiographical article not only highlights the importance of a convict’s voice, but also calls on criminologists to move beyond official data sources and crime reports to a more in-depth exploration of complex lives of the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated.

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“M” – Message from the Inside #2

December 10, 2010 § Leave a comment

Hi,

You will find that the plight of many, such as me, are not looked upon with great empathy.  You remeber me telling you about my brother-in-law—he is very connected in the Washington arena—and he has been very frank—“Joe six-pack” does not give a damn about us—and he will not give  a damn until he realizes that this is costing him—out of pocket–long-term, as most leave prison broke and without any resources—one reason what I wrote you about is such an important deal–as it can be used to bring forth to the public—the needs and what can be accomplished.
I should be medically cleared to go back to a level 2 within a week or so—then I am hoping to get back to the camp soon.  Let me know when you get the letter—please be
careful as to responses–as I do not want anyone to get the wrong idea.

Let me know–love, M

“M” – Message from the Inside #1

December 6, 2010 § Leave a comment

I received this message today from a dear friend of mine.  We will be working on project for the women who leave our prison system to have employment.  Although the National Prison Journal Project is for all prisoners, we cannot underestimate the need of more specific initiatives respecting the different needs of men and women behind bars.

My dear, 

I am here due to a medical issue—I have been at the Camp in Lexington—you will have a good laugh when I tell you why I left Danbury.  Ms. R nearly lost her baby—as we were exposed to truly lethal doses of toxic mold—I was taken to NY, then here.   I have about 36 months until I am out—I want to have much in place before that—so I will advise you as to the persons working on the project and what can be done.  You will not mind if I were to “pimp” you out—we can truly do some real good for these women—trust me it is worse than you can believe.

I will try to write you soon–and will e-mail—-I am weak –had surgery – got a horrible infection, re-operated on two weeks later—left with open wound from my belly-button to my crotch–.  Been on antibiotic drips—etc. and lots of medicine–am healing and truly being given good care.  Okay–lots more to tell you—take care.
Love,  M

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